Archive for June 18, 2022

Hurricane Ike hit on September 13, 2008. It forever changed the landscape of Galveston, Texas and the greater Houston area for that matter. I’ll never forget it’s power. Oak trees are not native to Galveston, but many were planted over the years to provide shade and add beauty to the island. Several were wiped out by hurricane Ike. I recently discovered that many artists breathed life into the standing oak stumps by carving art into them. Some are whimsical and some have meaning but they add a beauty and leave a memory that there is always hope after the storm. Whatever storm it may be. It was a journey and adventure to locate many of them around the island but also a way to see Galveston that I have never seen before. The neighborhoods beyond the beaches and seawall. It was definitely like a treasure hunt! I won’t include all the sculptures here. They are for you to go and find! Adventure! The collection of photos here are some of my favorites. Enjoy!

This palace is palatial at every level. Contruction started in 1887 and was completed in 1893 at a cost of $250,000. It was built by lawyer and politician Walter Gresham, which is why it is also known as Gresham’s Castle. The home is made of stone and has withstood all hurricanes including the great storm of 1900. I would say the builders knew a thing or two about the Three Little Pigs. In 1923, the home was purchased for $40,500, by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galveston for Bishop Christopher E. Byrne with the Sacred Heart Catholic church being conveniently across the street. Bishop Byrne lived there until 1950. In 2013, the home was sold to the current owners The Galveston Historical Association. From an architectural and artistic standpoint, the craftsmanship, materials, and art throughout the home are the best for the time and even by today’s standards. It’s an incredible home as you will see by some of the photos. I hope these photos inspire your own visit to learn about the history and see the beauty of this home. For more information visit here https://www.galvestonhistory.org/sites/1892-bishops-palace