Posts Tagged ‘Digital photography’

Hurricane Ike hit on September 13, 2008. It forever changed the landscape of Galveston, Texas and the greater Houston area for that matter. I’ll never forget it’s power. Oak trees are not native to Galveston, but many were planted over the years to provide shade and add beauty to the island. Several were wiped out by hurricane Ike. I recently discovered that many artists breathed life into the standing oak stumps by carving art into them. Some are whimsical and some have meaning but they add a beauty and leave a memory that there is always hope after the storm. Whatever storm it may be. It was a journey and adventure to locate many of them around the island but also a way to see Galveston that I have never seen before. The neighborhoods beyond the beaches and seawall. It was definitely like a treasure hunt! I won’t include all the sculptures here. They are for you to go and find! Adventure! The collection of photos here are some of my favorites. Enjoy!

This palace is palatial at every level. Contruction started in 1887 and was completed in 1893 at a cost of $250,000. It was built by lawyer and politician Walter Gresham, which is why it is also known as Gresham’s Castle. The home is made of stone and has withstood all hurricanes including the great storm of 1900. I would say the builders knew a thing or two about the Three Little Pigs. In 1923, the home was purchased for $40,500, by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galveston for Bishop Christopher E. Byrne with the Sacred Heart Catholic church being conveniently across the street. Bishop Byrne lived there until 1950. In 2013, the home was sold to the current owners The Galveston Historical Association. From an architectural and artistic standpoint, the craftsmanship, materials, and art throughout the home are the best for the time and even by today’s standards. It’s an incredible home as you will see by some of the photos. I hope these photos inspire your own visit to learn about the history and see the beauty of this home. For more information visit here https://www.galvestonhistory.org/sites/1892-bishops-palace

It was a pleasure to finally tour the Moody Mansion in Galveston, Texas. Its opulence cannot be understated for the time in history that it was built in 1895. The home has much history and has a total of 31 rooms. Prior to the Moody’s purchasing the $100,000 home for $20,000 after the great hurricane in 1900, it was owned by Narcissa Willis. From what I read she wanted a mansion, and her husband wanted the money distributed to their ten children upon his death. She did not abide by that, had her old home demolished, and built the mansion. It cost her dearly in my view because her ten children never talked to her again and she died a widow all alone in her dream house in 1899.

For more information on tours or the Moody Mansion visit the following link www.moodymansion.org

Here are a few photos from my visit. I hope you enjoy them, and it inspires you to visit and learn history.

Many people have heard of the famous pepper sauce Tabasco, but many have not heard about the Jungle Gardens that sit upon and island salt dome that is eight miles deep. This area was home to Edward McIlhenny the founder of Tabasco Pepper Sauce. Mr. McIlhenny helped saved the Snowy Egret from extinction in 1895 as its feathers were often used for women’s hats. He created a sanctuary for them. His Jungle Gardens represent a plant and wildlife sanctuary like none other. A paradise for birds and wildlife and a preserve area for all to enjoy. Every time I visit, I am enthralled by the beauty, sounds, texture, and tranquility. Here are a few photos that capture just a small portion of the beauty. I hope you enjoy them and consider a visit of Tabasco and The Jungle Gardens yourself. For more information visit the link below.

2022 Albert Moyer, Jr., Photography https://www.junglegardens.org/

It’s well-known that I love Louisiana for its beauty, food, and people. The vibrancy of life and comradery that exists is exceptional. Recently, I made stops in New Iberia, Houma, New Orleans, and Franklin, Louisiana. Here are a few photos from the road. I hope you enjoy! Thanks for stopping by. See you on the road.

2022 Albert Moyer, Jr., Photography

When I’m out and about the camera is never far from my hands. I love taking photos because an image caught in time says so much about a place or its history. Until this day the best camera I have seen is my eyes and I always wish to share images exactly the way I see them, but no camera does it. None on the market. The best way is always travel. Living the moment and being in the time right then seeing things live. Recently, I saw many cool scenes and images in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Here are but a few. The city and its people are wonderful. Its full of vibrant history. For more information visit this website: https://www.visitvicksburg.com/

2022 Albert Moyer, Jr., Photography

A few photos that I recently shot at the Houston Arboretum. There was so much more to see and take pictures of but some of the birds and other creatures were to fast to shoot. You don’t catch them all. Ha ha!

I heard about a restaurant that has served customers for 150 plus years. That is amazing in it’s own right. Being a fan of the superfood Oysters I learned Dupuy’s in Abbeville, Louisiana have some of the best. As I stepped in to this classic restaurant the scent of seafood and steak hit my nose like a beautiful food potpourri. The environment was classic Cajun and the service was excellent as I was welcomed like family. I ordered the Oyster combo with salad and shared white chocolate bread pudding. My plate came with Grilled Oysters, Fried Oysters, Oysters Rockefeller, and Sweet Potato Fries. The other dishes served were a monster foot long Shrimp Po-Boy and Oysters Rockefeller and Oysters de Ville. Everything was excellent and Dupuy’s will always be a stop for me when in Abbeville. To learn more check out their menu here http://www.dupuys.com

My love of South Louisiana begins with the solid value system of the Cajuns. They are a proud people who value family, having a good time, helping others, and God. They are humble, frugal, and know not to waste resources. The South Louisiana environment is swampy and humid and it provides all that one needs. It may not be for everyone, but I love it. Here are a few photos from my road trip. I hope you enjoy them. All photos Copyright Albert Moyer, Jr 2021

The Acadian Village is a great historical venue that gives one the feel of what life was like in the 1800’s in a Cajun Village. Many of the French Nova Scotians traveled to Louisiana to escape religious persecution. They did so in grand fashion using the available land resources to build extensive communities. In modern times, Cajun culture has spread throughout the world. People want Crawfish (`ecrevisse), Cracklins (Gratons), Boudin, Alligator, Turtle, Wild Hog, Duck, Sweet Dough Pies, and all the great things Cajun, including the music.

To be an Honorary Cajun is simple, you agree to do the following: Eat Cajun food, listen to Cajun Music, be filled with joy (joie de vivre), and pass a good time with laughter, happiness, and jokes. Let the good times roll! Laissez Les bons temps rouler!

Here are a few photos from the Acadian Village. I hope they inspire you to learn more and pay a visit to this wonderful historical cultural center. For more information click here https://acadianvillage.org/ All photos Copyright Albert Moyer, Jr 2021