Posts Tagged ‘United States’

Rip Van Winkle is a story written by Washington Irving in 1819, about a farmer who falls asleep in the Catskill Mountains of New York for 20 years, and he misses the whole American Revolution. Rip Van Winkle was played by actor Joseph Jefferson, over 4,500 hundred times, all over the world on stage. He purchased Orange Island, La in 1870 to make a hunting lodge, and to have a winter retreat. Eventually the Island was named Jefferson Island. It now has a rookery and the former home and gardens of Joseph Jefferson for tour. I enjoyed my visit tremendously! The Live Oaks and Spanish moss are worth the trip. It is beautiful! Here are a few photos from my visit including RIP’s rookery. For more information visit https://www.ripvanwinklegardens.com/


Lake Fausse Pointe State Park in St. Martinville, Louisiana is buried deep in the Atchafalaya basin. This is the place and home area to many of the swamp people you see on the T.V. show series Swamp People. It is a mystical area where wildlife abounds. As one local Cajun stated, “One doesn’t need a grocery store in these areas. We’ll survive. We have nutria, alligator, turtle, frogs, snakes, deer, hog, possum, coon (short for raccoon), honey, crawfish….and he went on. We have sugar cane, we have rice, we have all we need.” I believe this to, because the closet civilization is close to 25 miles away. Out here the night is so dark you cannot see your hands in front of you. You here sounds and movement but you cannot see. It creates much curiosity, but most of all the relaxation away from the big city is incredible. Here are a few photos from my trip. Two are outside of the park, but in the area. The bee boxes for honey and the Sugar Cane farm. For more information visit https://www.crt.state.la.us/louisiana-state-parks/parks/lake-fausse-pointe-state-park/index

Here are some random photos from my recent road trip through Louisiana. Years ago, I flew to many places, but soon learned I missed much by being stuck in a plane. Planes are necessary for certain things, but again, for me, nothing beats traveling by auto to see things I might not see otherwise. I also get a better feel for the culture and the people in the communities I visit. As you can see from the art a giant Crawfish, giant bass in Toledo Bend country, a homemade John-Deere Ice Cream machine, historical sites, beautiful Redbud trees, Pecan orchards, wide-open roads, and food you will find no place else, Louisiana is as unique as it is wonderful.

My recent trip to the Cane River Historic Site was a great experience. I was able to learn many things. One of most amazing for me was the insulation methods using Bousillage. This is horse hair, Spanish Moss, and Clay mixed together to insulate and build homes. I learned that pigeons(squab) were raised for food, and if you had pigeons to eat you were wealthy. How about that? Amazing stuff! The plantation has the owners home, young family members home, overseers home, slave cabins, the store, pigeoneers house, corn crib, fattening pins, wash house, carriage house, the cook’s cabin, and well it is very complete piece of living history. I learned that some slaves enjoyed their owners and became sharecroppers after slaves were freed, while others had horrible masters. I learned that African-Americans also had plantations and even owned their own slaves. Did you know slaves were sold on the open market in Africa by fellow Africans to willing buyers? A few things I was never taught in history class. It seems I was always taught “THE ROOTS” version of history, but I don’t blame my teachers. They could only teach what they were taught, and maybe only teach what they were told to teach, but I am glad I can learn on my own. Here are a few photos from my recent trip. I hope you visit this piece of history. For more information visit https://www.nps.gov/crha/index.htm

Photography has to be one of the most relaxing things I have found in recent years. Often our memories cannot capture or remember certain things but the camera is a great friend for that job. Here is a small collection of photos that I took around Corpus Christi Harbor and Bay. Thank you for viewing and your continued support.

One of the finest museums I have ever been on is the U.S.S. Lexington aircraft carrier. It is also known as the “Blue Ghost” because of several attempts by the Japanese to sink it. They were unsuccessful even with a dive bombing Kamikaze attack. The men and women who served, sacrificed, and died to maintained this floating city have my utmost respect. This aircraft carrier museum has so much to see and do that you could easily spend days on it. I took so many photos that I cannot post them all. It was amazing at every level! The engineering that went into this ship in 1943 was spectacular. To extract salt out of sea water and create steam for four huge turbines to power the Lexington was a marvel. To include a kitchen, sleeping quarters, machine shop, hospital, dentist office, barbershop, post office, church, and pharmacy, at that time was beyond innovative. For more information on the U.S.S. Lexington Museum visit here https://usslexington.com/

Here is just but a small sampling of photo’s from my visit. I hope these photos inspire you to visit and learn the history of this great ship.

My father recently passed and one of the greatest gifts he ever taught me was to eat well. Whether it was a simple pot of beans, or the finest steak, my dad always stressed that good food was one of the many secrets to living a great life. Dad would by a $5 pair of sneakers for a $15 steak. He had his priorities straight. Food before anything else. The Central Market in Houston was one of my dad’s favorite grocery stores. It has just about anything a person could want in the way of food. Rarely do people sit around a table today and enjoy a great meal as a family. It is a dying tradition that in my opinion is causing many of us to die. Family meals and the bonding and sharing that go along with them are vitally important. I decided to shoot a few photos to share of my dad’s favorite grocery store. The purpose is two fold. One to is to promote this great place Central Market and two to stress the importance of great eating and spending time together as a family. If you do not know how to cook, no worries, their are plenty of YouTube videos and cookbooks. Do learn how to cook and make food a part of the great times of life.

The Zilker Botanical Garden is what I envision if I were in Heaven with its herb garden, prehistoric garden, cactus and succulent garden, butterfly garden, rose garden, oriental garden, green garden, and pioneer village. I have been many places and for a $2 entrance fee I thought it to be of one of the best values ever. There are so many excellent photo opportunities in the garden areas. It is peaceful, relaxing, and beautiful. I walked it during a day that had 102 degree temperatures and felt totally comfortable. This garden will show you how important canopy cover is to maintaining cool temperatures on the ground even during extreme heat. For more information on Zilker Botanical Garden click this link: http://www.zilkergarden.org/

2018 Albert Moyer, Jr. Photography

Hamilton Pool Preserve is considered one of the top summer swimming destinations in Texas. Thankfully, you can only enter with reservations to protect the environment from over use and damage. To see it in person and swim in the clear emerald-green waters is a real treat, as is the hike along Hamilton Creek to the Pedernales River. Going there you get a sense of what life might have been like in the seventeen or eighteen hundreds before modern piping, showers, housing, etc. It is peaceful, tranquil, and really enjoyable. Here are some photos from Hamilton Pool and the hike along Hamilton Creek. For more information about reservations click here: https://parks.traviscountytx.gov/find-a-park/hamilton-pool

Bastrop State Park is a great place that has a lot to offer, but with a changed landscape. I visited in March of 2010 and took photos. Recently, I had a chance to visit again and see the damage caused by the great fire of 2011. I was amazed at the damage as well as all the regrowth. I imagine with no further damage Bastrop State Park will be back to itself by the time I retire. Fire is a dangerous thing especially during drought. Please use caution. The first four photos are from my 2010 visit and the last four from my recent June 2018 visit for comparison.  For more information on this great fire visit here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bastrop_County_Complex_Fire