Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana’

Cajun food at it’s best! Certified Cajun Crawfish and Mississippi Catfish. Support American workers. Photo 2021 Albert Moyer, Jr. Photography

Wow! I am always cooking something, but I am not always writing about it. I wanted to cook a Blackened Catfish recipe that could be topped with a Crawfish Etouffee, as I have recently been cooking more with cast iron. Cast iron is another topic, but I must say it is the best cookware I have ever used, and it is very non-stick and versatile, if you treat it the way it needs to be treated. During my search for a recipe, I came across this one for the Blackened Catfish and wanted to share it. Chef Charlie Andrews makes the video simple and if you follow it you will have some excellent Blackened Catfish which you can eat as a stand alone or you can top with whatever your heart desires such as shrimp, scallops, crab meat, etc. Chef Charlie Andrews knocks it out of the park with this Blackened Catfish recipe. Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtG_UJf2N38&t=355s

I heard about a restaurant that has served customers for 150 plus years. That is amazing in it’s own right. Being a fan of the superfood Oysters I learned Dupuy’s in Abbeville, Louisiana have some of the best. As I stepped in to this classic restaurant the scent of seafood and steak hit my nose like a beautiful food potpourri. The environment was classic Cajun and the service was excellent as I was welcomed like family. I ordered the Oyster combo with salad and shared white chocolate bread pudding. My plate came with Grilled Oysters, Fried Oysters, Oysters Rockefeller, and Sweet Potato Fries. The other dishes served were a monster foot long Shrimp Po-Boy and Oysters Rockefeller and Oysters de Ville. Everything was excellent and Dupuy’s will always be a stop for me when in Abbeville. To learn more check out their menu here http://www.dupuys.com

My love of South Louisiana begins with the solid value system of the Cajuns. They are a proud people who value family, having a good time, helping others, and God. They are humble, frugal, and know not to waste resources. The South Louisiana environment is swampy and humid and it provides all that one needs. It may not be for everyone, but I love it. Here are a few photos from my road trip. I hope you enjoy them. All photos Copyright Albert Moyer, Jr 2021

The Acadian Village is a great historical venue that gives one the feel of what life was like in the 1800’s in a Cajun Village. Many of the French Nova Scotians traveled to Louisiana to escape religious persecution. They did so in grand fashion using the available land resources to build extensive communities. In modern times, Cajun culture has spread throughout the world. People want Crawfish (`ecrevisse), Cracklins (Gratons), Boudin, Alligator, Turtle, Wild Hog, Duck, Sweet Dough Pies, and all the great things Cajun, including the music.

To be an Honorary Cajun is simple, you agree to do the following: Eat Cajun food, listen to Cajun Music, be filled with joy (joie de vivre), and pass a good time with laughter, happiness, and jokes. Let the good times roll! Laissez Les bons temps rouler!

Here are a few photos from the Acadian Village. I hope they inspire you to learn more and pay a visit to this wonderful historical cultural center. For more information click here https://acadianvillage.org/ All photos Copyright Albert Moyer, Jr 2021

Rip Van Winkle is a story written by Washington Irving in 1819, about a farmer who falls asleep in the Catskill Mountains of New York for 20 years, and he misses the whole American Revolution. Rip Van Winkle was played by actor Joseph Jefferson, over 4,500 hundred times, all over the world on stage. He purchased Orange Island, La in 1870 to make a hunting lodge, and to have a winter retreat. Eventually the Island was named Jefferson Island. It now has a rookery and the former home and gardens of Joseph Jefferson for tour. I enjoyed my visit tremendously! The Live Oaks and Spanish moss are worth the trip. It is beautiful! Here are a few photos from my visit including RIP’s rookery. For more information visit https://www.ripvanwinklegardens.com/


Lake Fausse Pointe State Park in St. Martinville, Louisiana is buried deep in the Atchafalaya basin. This is the place and home area to many of the swamp people you see on the T.V. show series Swamp People. It is a mystical area where wildlife abounds. As one local Cajun stated, “One doesn’t need a grocery store in these areas. We’ll survive. We have nutria, alligator, turtle, frogs, snakes, deer, hog, possum, coon (short for raccoon), honey, crawfish….and he went on. We have sugar cane, we have rice, we have all we need.” I believe this to, because the closet civilization is close to 25 miles away. Out here the night is so dark you cannot see your hands in front of you. You here sounds and movement but you cannot see. It creates much curiosity, but most of all the relaxation away from the big city is incredible. Here are a few photos from my trip. Two are outside of the park, but in the area. For more information visit https://www.crt.state.la.us/louisiana-state-parks/parks/lake-fausse-pointe-state-park/index

Here are some random photos from my recent road trip through Louisiana. Years ago, I flew to many places, but soon learned I missed much by being stuck in a plane. Planes are necessary for certain things, but again, for me, nothing beats traveling by auto to see things I might not see otherwise. I also get a better feel for the culture and the people in the communities I visit. As you can see from the art a giant Crawfish, giant bass in Toledo Bend country, a homemade John-Deere Ice Cream machine, historical sites, beautiful Redbud trees, Pecan orchards, wide-open roads, and food you will find no place else, Louisiana is as unique as it is wonderful.

My recent trip to the Cane River Historic Site was a great experience. I was able to learn many things. One of most amazing for me was the insulation methods using Bousillage. This is horse hair, Spanish Moss, and Clay mixed together to insulate and build homes. I learned that pigeons(squab) were raised for food, and if you had pigeons to eat you were wealthy. How about that? Amazing stuff! The plantation has the owners home, young family members home, overseers home, slave cabins, the store, pigeoneers house, corn crib, fattening pins, wash house, carriage house, the cook’s cabin, and well it is very complete piece of living history. I learned that some slaves enjoyed their owners and became sharecroppers after slaves were freed, while others had horrible masters. I learned that African-Americans also had plantations and even owned their own slaves. Did you know slaves were sold on the open market in Africa by fellow Africans to willing buyers? A few things I was never taught in history class. It seems I was always taught “THE ROOTS” version of history, but I don’t blame my teachers. They could only teach what they were taught, and maybe only teach what they were told to teach, but I am glad I can learn on my own. Here are a few photos from my recent trip. I hope you visit this piece of history. For more information visit https://www.nps.gov/crha/index.htm

Starting off let me say this….I love meat pies! I have heard about Lasyone’s legendary pies, service, and let me state for the record, they did not disappoint, or let me down. My Crawfish pie came out crisp and tasty. The pie seemed to have eight ounces of Crawfish tail meat in it. It was packed with Crawfish tails. The surprise was the side of jambalaya. It was so delicious! They also have excellent Po-Boys. The service was exceptional. Everywhere manners were evident. I have nothing bad to say. I’ll definitely make Lasyone’s Meat Pie Restaurant a go to stop when in Natchitoches. Here are few photos. Do have a meat pie in Natchitoches at Lasyone’s!

Kaffie-Frederick General Store, founded in 1863, is Louisiana’s oldest general store, located in Natchitoches, La. The store still has the original working elevator and cash register from 1910. Yes, you need to know how to count change. That seems to be a lost art. A trip into the store takes you back to a time when things were a litter slower and less complicated. I saw so many toys from the past. My children were amazed at the top. They had never seen one. Once I made it spin they laughed and enjoyed watching it spin. My favorite thing was buying a Coca-Cola in the bottle paying based on the honor system. For those of you who do not know, it means the store trusts you to be honest, and pay for what you take without cameras. A rarity in modern times. I include a photo of sheriff and police badges. When I was a child it was an honor to have one to wear and pretend to round up criminals with our cap guns. Today, we deal with police haters. Times have changed. Not for the better in my opinion. Here are a few photos from our visit. I hope they inspire you to travel to Natchitoches. Enjoy!