Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Work, family, relationships, and various other activities take our time daily. Often, if you are a person who can get things done, you are called on more often than you sometimes wish. One thing that took me years to master is the ability to say, “NO!” Often, if a person has a good heart, they want to help. The problem is there is only so much time in the time bank. As I was checking news this morning, I came across an article that I thought was worth sharing, because it has very good information regarding saying, “No.” to others.

Eight Ways To Say, “No!”

If you want something done, ask a busy person. The old saying rings true, but it also spells doom for that busy person. When you develop a reputation for being responsive and generous, an ever-expanding mountain of requests will come your way. This may be why Warren Buffett says: “The difference between successful people and very successful people is that very successful people say ‘no’ to almost everything.”
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For those of us who enjoy being helpful—or just plain polite—this is no easy task. Every “no” is a missed opportunity to make a difference and build a relationship. And if it comes across the wrong way to the wrong person, it’s also a surefire way to brand yourself as selfish and rude.
As long as I can remember, I’ve been terrible at saying no. If it benefited other people more than it cost me, I would try to help. With a growing family and increasing professional responsibilities, I knew I needed to say no more often, but I had a hard time actually doing it.

Last year, I got the push I needed when the New York Times magazine ran a cover story on my book, Give and Take. Since the book focuses on the surprising success of givers—people who consistently help others with no strings attached—it was only natural to analyze how I handle these dynamics myself. A much bigger audience became aware that “no” tended to be absent from my vocabulary, and I was flooded with thousands of emails from people seeking help.

I learned that there’s a big difference between pleasing people and helping them. Being a giver is not about saying yes to all of the people all of the time to all of the requests. It’s about saying yes to some of the people (generous givers and “matchers” who aim for quid pro quo, but not necessarily the selfish takers) some of the time (when it won’t compromise your own goals and ambitions) to some of the requests (when you have resources or skills that are uniquely relevant). Outside those specific conditions, successful givers follow Buffett’s edict and decline for one fundamental reason:
Saying no frees you up to say yes when it matters most.

But the rest of the time, how do you say no without burning bridges and jeopardizing your reputation? Since it wasn’t possible to say yes to everyone, I got a crash course in saying no. I ended up test-driving eight responses. Each had advantages and disadvantages, and proved appropriate with different people in different circumstances:

1. The Deferral: “I’m swamped right now, but feel free to follow-up”
My first response was to explain candidly that my availability was limited while traveling on book tour, but I hoped to have more flexibility a few months down the road. This initial filter provided clues about who cared the most about connecting with me. I liked prioritizing the people who were passionate and persistent. But I also unwittingly rewarded the stalkers and the takers—people so aggressive and single-minded that they would do whatever it took to get what they wanted. As Joel Stein laments, it’s all too common that we end up helping “the pushy ones” and miss the people who are too respectful of your time to bother you at all, let alone again.

2. The Referral: “I’m not qualified to do what you’re asking, but here’s something else”
Many requests were so far removed from my expertise that saying yes would have been a disservice. (A word to the wise: don’t ask an organizational psychologist for assistance with startup financing or a medical malpractice lawsuit.) When people reached out for career advice, although I empathized with them, I have no training as a career counselor. In the rare occasions when I offer career suggestions, it’s after observing a student in class and having multiple conversations during office hours.

Not wanting to leave anyone empty-handed, I replied that I’m generally reluctant to give prescriptive advice, especially to people I don’t know. In lieu of that, here are some resources that might be useful: books on career choices (The Startup of You, Finding Your Element, So Good They Can’t Ignore You) and assessments for clarifying your values (Decision Pulse), strengths (Reflected Best Self and Strengths Finder), and career interests (Self-Directed Search). These referrals allowed me to avoid saying no outright and to engage equally with everyone in a way that protected my time.

3. The Introduction: “This isn’t in my wheelhouse, but I know someone who might be helpful”
When I wasn’t in a position to help, I sometimes knew people who could. Provided that I had a way to verify the requestor’s trustworthiness, I facilitated the connection. This was a huge time-saver and often proved far more helpful than the other approaches: some people landed jobs, and one of my introductions accidentally resulted in a marriage. As I wrote a few months ago, introductions are the gift we love to receive but forget to give.

Despite the appeal of introductions, there’s one major downside: they can be an imposition on the person who’s being enlisted to help. I didn’t mind asking givers who weren’t too busy and matchers who had benefited from my help in the past. But I worried about becoming what Ken Chester calls a Robin Hood giver, someone who “zealously gives to one group of people by taking from others.” I started checking with my colleagues first to see if they were comfortable with an introduction. That way, I didn’t punish the most generous givers by overloading them with requests—and it was less likely to damage our relationship or my reputation. This saved some embarrassment and some amusement (in at least three cases, I attempted to introduce people who already knew each other).

4. The Bridge: “You two are working toward common goals”
Inevitably, due diligence failed in some cases, and the introduction wasn’t productive. Instead of inconveniencing one person to help another, I started looking for ways to make mutually beneficial connections. When I heard from an aspiring screenwriter asking to get his screenplay read by a film industry insider, I remembered an earlier note from a depressed comedy writer searching for a way to help others. Rather than putting these two strangers in touch with people from my network, I connected them to each other. And when a series of entrepreneurs asked for feedback on apps designed to facilitate seeking and giving help, I put them in contact so they could support one another’s efforts.

5. The Triage: “Meet my colleague, who will set up a time to chat”
Unfortunately, these moments of serendipitous synergy don’t happen every day, and I was still taking a larger number of calls than I had time to handle. I hired Reb, an applied psychology expert, to collaborate on a variety of projects. When a request was related to his expertise, he fielded the initial conversation and reported back, and we evaluated whether there were unique ways we could help. His rare combination of competence and compassion has made this remarkably effective.

6. The Batch: “Others have posed the same question, so let’s chat together”
A dialogue with a former student opened my eyes to another response. Ryan is a military veteran who transitioned into business, and I was stunned to learn that he schedules upwards of 100 calls per month with fellow veterans pursuing that path. It seemed inefficient to take those calls individually when he was providing similar information to each person, so I suggested inviting them in small groups to weekly Google Hangouts. I ended up following my own advice, and found that it helped people create a community around common interests. It also served as a low-commitment first encounter for me to gauge how helpful I could be in subsequent interactions.

7. The Relational Account: “If I helped you, I’d be letting others down”
Even though I tried to help in other ways, each of these responses meant declining the original request, which was hard for me to do. Anne Lamott writes that “‘No is a complete sentence,” but it’s not a very nice sentence. Research shows that saying no can make us appear cold and selfish, and due to gender stereotypes, declining costs women more than men. As Sheryl Sandberg observes in Lean In, “when a woman declines to help a colleague, she often receives less favorable reviews and fewer rewards. But a man who declines to help? He pays no penalty.”

The good news is that there’s a friendly way to circumvent this risk. It’s called a relational account, and it involves referencing your commitment to other people when declining the focal person. Studies by Hannah Riley Bowles and Linda Babcock reveal that when we offer relational accounts for going against the norm, we’re viewed more favorably, as we preserve our image as giving and caring. Here are some of my relational accounts:

•Mentoring requests: “Students are my top priority professionally, and since I teach more than 300 students per year, I don’t have the bandwidth to take on additional mentoring.”
•Speaking requests: “With more than two dozen speaking invitations rolling in per week, my wife and I have set a limit for speaking engagements, and at this point, I’m maxed out.”
•Introduction requests: “I’d become a taker if I kept asking this person for favors” or “I don’t know this person well enough to impose.”

8. The Learning Opportunity
One guy wouldn’t take no for an answer. I tried the deferral, the referral, the batch, and the relational account, but he kept coming back.
I might have responded differently if he had followed some of the recommendations in Mattan Griffel’s insightful post on getting busy people to answer your email, or my list of six ways to get me to email you back. Instead, I decided to level with him:
“I’m sorry to disappoint. One of my goals for this year is to improve my ability to say no—you are a tough audience. I suppose it’s good practice…”

At that point, he moved on. Meanwhile, I’m still practicing.

Adam is a Wharton professor and the author of Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success, a New York Times bestseller. You can follow him on Twitter @AdamMGrantand sign up for his free newsletter at http://www.giveandtake.com.

I have long been a fan of nuts. I love them in breads, cereal, salads, or just to snack. Some say they cost too much, but I say,”They are a lot cheaper than prescription drugs.” So eat more nuts!

http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/21/health/nuts-longevity-time/

We have all known for a while now that fried foods are bad for us.  Here is another reason to avoid them. Acrylamides! They are a known carcinogen.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2013/11/15/the-fda-calls-out-yet-another-food-chemical-to-avoid-acrylamide/

Let’s all hope this doesn’t become the next big thing, because it is really NASTY! Your flesh eats away while you get high.

‘THE DRUG THAT EATS JUNKIES’

Krokodil originated in Russia but has spread across the world at an alarming rate.

It has become so popular because it is three times cheaper to produce and buy than heroin and the intense high lasts for an hour and a half.

Dubbed ‘the drug that eats junkies’, it rots from the inside, causing such severe damage to tissue that users suffer from gangrenous sores which open all the way to the bone.

Continual use of Krokodil causes blood vessels to burst, leaving skin green and scaly among addicts eventually causing gangrene and their flesh to begin to rot.

Rabid use in Russia has caused up to 2.5 million people to register and seek treatment as addicts and the average life span for a user is only two to three years.

The condition can lead to limbs being amputated, but life expectancy for addicts is at the most two to three years, with the majority dying within a year.

The drug, whose name means ‘crocodile’ – reportedly a reference to the way it turns users’ skin scaly – also rots their brains.

Krokodil is a sickening cocktail of over the counter painkillers, paint thinner, acid and phosphorus. In some cases, petrol is also added.

The resulting mixture is called desomorphine – a derivative of morphine – and is extremely addictive.

During my bike ride today, I noticed over three miles of trash along the bayou from heavy rains this weekend. It appalls me to hear people complain about oil companies, yet they don’t take time to throw away their own trash. This trash is polluting the globe at a phenomenal rate.  If I am correct, plastic takes over 80 years to degrade. People take your trash to the trash can! Stop ruining our waterways!

About Ten Yards of Trash Along A Three Mile Stretch

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Is low-fat always good?

Posted: September 12, 2013 in Health
Tags: , , ,

I see people eat low-fat pre-packaged foods on a regular basis. Interestingly, they are not losing any weight. They actually become more ill. The real problem is they are sedentary, and they want magic weight loss food that they can open without effort, and warm or eat instantly.

Here is the skinny on low-fat diets. Health education is the way to go. Be informed.

http://www.webmd.com/diet/low-fat-diet

People nowadays are looking all over for energy because they are drained. It is easy for one to have hope in a can or bottle, because that takes very little effort other than opening it and drinking it down. That is why most people lack energy to begin with on their part. They lack an effort to eat right, exercise, socialize, push themselves, and all the other great things God gave us to be happy and full of energy. So there is my blurb on this blog.

The latest on so-called energy drinks.

Studies warn against energy drinks before workout
Thursday, August 1, 2013
Always down an energy drink before working out because it seems to really
get the blood pumping? Think again, according to new research.
Houston cardiologist John Higgins tested the effect of a 24-ounce Monster
beverage on his own heart function and the effect of the amount of caffeine
in an energy drink on the blood flow of healthy young and not-so-young
people before and after a workout. In both cases, the results were
disruptive enough to cause Higgins to advise against pre-workout
consumption.
“Energy drinks really aren’t good for you anytime, but especially before a
workout,” said Higgins, a professor at the University of Texas Medical
School at Houston. “You should have water or a sports drink instead.”
In a July paper in the International Journal of Cardiology, Higgins reported
that his cardiac blood vessels became sluggish and didn’t open as well after
drinking the Monster beverage, compared to their function before
consumption. Cardiac measurements showed function was significantly
decreased at 50 minutes and acutely decreased at 90 minutes.
In an August paper in the American Journal of Medicine, Higgins found 200 mg
tablets of pure caffeine reduced the heart’s blood flow during subsequent
exercise by 22 percent among participants whose average age was 27 and by 14
percent among participants whose average age was 58.
Higgins suspects the culprit it is not just the caffeine but its interaction
with some other ingredient in energy drinks. He will try to identify the
exact cause in future research, he said.
Higgins, who said he wasn’t hardcore enough to test on himself the vascular
effects of the not recommended but still popular pastime of mixing energy
drinks and alcohol, will present his research on the vascular effects of
caffeinated energy drinks at an Institute of Medicine workshop in Washington
next week.

A lot of times I am asked about my life and how I accomplish things. “Help! I hear.” Sometimes, I am the one asking for,”Help!”

So today, I decided to do a post about the things that benefit me, and I know can benefit others. These ten things can change your life.

Help! It’s right here.

1. Banks- Banks have a main goal that is to make money and earn interest off their assets. Their goal is really not the customer even though they must pretend that they love      you to death. Banks have high priority for those who are ultra-wealthy and low priority for most of society. They often see the lower-income earners as burdens even though they are glad to have what little money you own to help their bottom line, which is to make money. So with that said, don’t pay the banks! Pay yourself! How do you pay yourself? Invest in stocks, mutual funds, and bonds that pay you interest(money). Avoid credit cards and borrowing! If you don’t have the money, then don’t buy it! Do not give the banks extra money, so that you can have a depreciating (losing money) asset. Think assets (what pads or lines your pocket), not liabilities (things that take away from your money).

2. Insurers- Insurers protect you from liability(responsibility to pay for loss) and protect the things your own(assets). Many times, we do not have the necessary cash flow to pay for huge losses. With that said, buy insurance on everything of value, that you cannot replace with the cash you have on hand. I believe in insuring everything possible.Insurance can be expensive, but the price is small when you have a disaster.

3. Retail purchases and autos- Purchasing anything new is like throwing money away in the trash. Why? Almost anything new loses extreme cash value. Purchase clothes, shoes, goods, and autos used so that someone else can lose the cash value and take the big depreciation hit for you. In return, you are benefiting your assets and helping the environment by recycling. The money saved can be invested so that you are paying yourself.

4. Groceries- Purchase fruits and vegetables that are in season so that you get the best value. Buy dry goods and other items in bulk if you have storage capacity to save money. Buy organic foods when possible to avoid chemically laden food products. Natural foods will save your retirement money for you and not prescription drugs to maintain your health. Avoid most cleaning products because they often do not work as stated and they are hazardous. One can clean and disinfect almost everything with bleach, lemon juice, vinegar, and soap.

5. Entertainment-  Always look for early season bargains on passes to museums, zoos, water parks, amusement parks, etc. The passes allow you to go to a place as much as you want without paying for a ticket every visit. The passes usually pay for themselves within one or two visits. For movies, hit the matinees and save up to 25% per ticket. If you want to take it further, pack your own food. This is always healthier and a huge savings.

6. Health- Avoid all drugs (prescription and illegal) as much as possible. The body hates drugs especially your stomach, liver, and kidneys. Avoid alcohol as much as possible and limit to no more than one drink a day maximum. Eat as many plant-based foods as you want, love and use fresh garlic, and limit consumption of animal products. Diets high in vegetables, grains, and fruits help you to have the power to enjoy life in your senior years and save your retirement money for trips and not prescription pills. At my age, I am watching friends far apart and break down, because they never took the lifestyle choice of being healthy serious. Protect your skin from the sun with sunscreen and clothing for that beautiful youthful look. Drink plenty of water and limit sugary drinks. I would say to avoid all man-made food additives as much as possible especially monosodium glutamate (makes you gain weight)  and high fructose corn syrup (diabetes link).

7. Donate- Donate what you do not need to charity organizations or others. Donate time to help make a difference in the environment or someones life. Donating time, money, and goods are great for the soul and health of the body. Another added benefit is the government recognizes the importance of donating and often many things can be used as a tax write off.

8. Religion- Prescribe to a faith and stick to its teachings as much as possible. I say as much as possible, because it is unreal to expect perfection. Of course, I am bias to Jesus Christ and Christianity, because Jesus washes me clean even though I am a sinner. Many religions base salvation on good works, but you can never have enough good works. It is impossible! We can never be perfect and Jesus knows this. A benefit of religion is added years to your life which is backed by research. It also gives one and improved state of mind and greater outlook on life.

9. Human relations- Listen and watch a person to know their heart and state of mind. Know who they hang around. Unfortunately, not everyone is nice or good. If something is great and another tells you it is bad, then you must realize that person is bad. If committing a certain act is bad and another tries to convince you it is o.k. that person is bad. Great people work to bring you up, help you, and show you good things. Bad people are the opposite because they tear you down, do not help you or your life, and they will show you in the worst way how not to be successful. A rattlesnake has a pattern and rattle for a reason. To warn you of it’s danger! Humans also have patterns and characteristics.

10. Education- I cannot state it enough! Read, study, and learn all that you can about as many topics as you can. Be a renaissance man/woman!

The other day, I was in a break room during lunch and I noticed the many foods being consumed.

In one chair, I see a person who is grossly overweight eating M&M’s, Twinkies, and a Coke.

In another chair, I see a person drinking a Monster energy drink and eating chips while complaining about a lack of energy.

In yet another chair, I hear a person talking about losing weight, while they consume a chemically laden Lean Cuisine along with a diet Coke.

These observations are made quite often by me, and most of the time, I am left shaking my head.

To lose weight one needs exercise. There are no magic foods or drinks. In fact, processed food is the worst for anyone trying to lose weight.

For energy, one needs sleep, exercise, vitamins, and minerals. None of these are best obtained from a can, except maybe some vitamins or minerals. The ideal situation is making time for sleep, exercise, and eating whole foods.

When a person fails to make time for sleep, exercise, or eating properly, that speaks volumes about that person. If a person doesn’t make time for their own health and body, it makes you wonder whom else will they cheat? If they will cheat themselves, they will cheat you too.

Here are foods that fight fatigue:

http://www.webmd.com/diet/fight-fatigue-energy-foods-6/power-up

Here are foods that help with weight loss:

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/15-foods-to-help-you-lose

 

Foods That Do The Body Great

 Here are a few foods and some of the benefits they provide. Almost all vegetables and herbs provide lasting health benefits. This list is not all-inclusive. There are many more fruits and vegetables out there with health benefits.

In fact, the best health insurance plan or prescription available today, better than Obama Care, is eating healthy. Stay away from man-made packaged, processed, food, and reduce consumption of sugary foods. Avoid drugs and over consumption of alcohol. This will assure you reduced health care costs.

Avocado– A 1996 study done by researchers in Mexico found that people who ate avocado every day for one week experienced an average 17 percent drop in total blood cholesterol. What’s more, their levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol decreased and HDL (“good”) cholesterol increased.

 Whole grains The soluble fiber found in whole grains, such as whole-wheat bread, brown rice, and oatmeal binds the cholesterol in your meal and drags it out of your body, when your body needs to utilize cholesterol in the future, it draws on your blood cholesterol supply, effectively lowering your total blood cholesterol level and your risk for heart disease

 Olive oil A 2011 study found that people ages 65 or older who regularly used olive oil (for both cooking and as a dressing) were 41 percent less likely to have a stroke compared to those who never use olive oil in their diet.

Nuts- Almonds are very high in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, vitamin E, and fiber, while walnuts are a great plant-based source of an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha-linolenic acid.” According to the American Heart Association, monounsaturated fats can help reduce levels of bad cholesterol in your blood and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.

 Fish- Fatty fish such as mackerel, herring, tuna, sardines, and salmon are full of omega-3 fatty acids. Eating fish twice a week can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by decreasing inflammation and lowering triglyceride levels, and it may even help boost your HDL levels.

 Asparagus- Asparagus is one of the best, natural artery-clearing foods around, says Shane Ellison, an organic chemist and author of Over-The-Counter Natural Cures. “Asparagus works within the 100,000 miles of veins and arteries to release pressure, thereby allowing the body to accommodate for inflammation that has accumulated over the years.” It also helps ward off deadly clots.

 Pomegranate- Pomegranate contains phytochemicals that act as antioxidants to protect the lining of the arteries from damage. A 2005 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice stimulated the body’s production of nitric oxide, which helps keep blood flowing and arteries open.

 Broccoli- Broccoli is rich in vitamin K, which is needed for bone formation and helps to keep calcium from damaging the arteries. Not to mention, broccoli is full of fiber, and studies show a high-fiber diet can also help to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Turmeric- The spice turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory. It contains curcumin which lowers inflammation—a major cause of arteriosclerosis or hardening of the arteries. A 2009 study found that curcumin helped reduce the fatty deposits in arteries by as much as 26 percent.

 Persimmons- Research shows the polyphenols found in this fruit (which has twice as much fiber and more antioxidants than an apple) can help decrease levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

 Orange juice A 2011 study published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that drinking two daily cups of 100-percent orange juice can help reduce diastolic (resting) blood pressure. OJ contains an antioxidant that has been found to help improve blood vessel function.

 Spirulina- A daily 4,500 mg dose of these blue – green algae can help relax artery walls and normalize blood pressure. It may also help your liver balance your blood fat levels—decreasing your LDL cholesterol by 10 percent and raising HDL cholesterol by 15 percent, according a recent study.

 Cinnamon- Just one teaspoon a day of antioxidant-rich cinnamon can help reduce fats in the bloodstream, helping to prevent plaque build up in the arteries and lower bad cholesterol levels by as much as 26 percent, according to recent research.

Cranberries- Research shows that potassium-rich cranberries can help reduce LDL cholesterol levels and help raise the good HDL levels in your body, and regular consumption may help reduce your overall risk of heart disease by as much as 40 percent.

 Green Tea- Green tea is rich in catechins, compounds that have been shown to decrease cholesterol absorption in your body. Another bonus? It may help prevent cancer and weight gain, too!

 Watermelon- A Florida State University study found that people given a 4,000 mg supplement of L-citrulline (an amino acid found in watermelon) lowered their blood pressure in just six weeks. Researchers say the amino acid helps your body produce nitric oxide, which widens blood vessels.

 Spinach- The potassium and folate found in spinach can help lower blood pressure, and according to recent research, one serving of nutrient-packed leafy greens (like spinach) a day can help reduce your risk of heart disease by 11 percent. Enjoy some in salads, omelets, and smoothies.

 Garlic- Garlic has a long history dating back to ancient times of use in treating all kinds of heart-related diseases and hypertension. Studies have shown that high doses of garlic (2,400 mg of deodorized garlic per day) significantly lowered both diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Also, many studies have shown that eating garlic regularly can reduce harmful cholesterol by 10 percent or more. It may also prevent blood clots from forming.

It also contains the strong antibiotic allicin.

Grapes- Red seedless grapes are a good source of lutein – a carotenoid that’s been shown to help reduce early arteriosclerosis. Recent studies have shown that lutein also helps prevent thickening of the carotid artery in the neck, an indication of atherosclerosis. It also lowers inflammation of LDL cholesterol in artery walls.

Cherries- The tiny sweet fruit contains over 17 compounds to clear away clogged arteries of plaque even better than vitamin supplements. These compounds, found in the anthocyanins that give cherries their red color. Cherries hold more antioxidant power than well-known vitamin C and E supplements. Plus being a whole food, you will better absorb all the wonderful nutrients including beneficial fiber which helps to lower cholesterol.

Strawberries- Perfect to toss into your breakfast cereal, strawberries are also loaded with antioxidants, including vitamin C and E, ellagic acid, assorted carotenoid and anthocyanins. They can cut cholesterol levels by 10 percent. Try to buy organic strawberries as they tend to be heavily sprayed with pesticides.

Apples- Apples are a rich source of “quercetin” including potassium and magnesium – minerals that keep your blood pressure under control. A French study found that eating two apples a day can help prevent and reverse “hardening” of the arteries. Red Delicious and Granny Smith varieties of apple are also rich in procyanidins. Apples are also rich in pectin which lowers blood cholesterol.

 Sweet potatoes Full of cholesterol-lowering fiber, potassium, beta carotene, folate and vitamin C, Sweet Potatoes help to lower your blood pressure and keep your arteries clear.

Tomatoes Tomatoes are rich in carotenoid lycopene, an antioxidant that can significantly lower your risk of atherosclerosis nearly in half. Also, antioxident-rich tomatoes may make LDL cholesterol much less susceptible to becoming oxidized – being a first step in the formation of artery-clogging plaque formation which is a major risk factor for heart disease.

Garbanzo Beans- All beans contain both important soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, but garbanzo beans are one of the best – which help to remove cholesterol-containing bile from your body. They are also known to help prevent heart disease.

 Sources: Various